Marie Antaya's blog

The Toughest Part of Training to Evaluate: Results

Examining organizational results is often the toughest, but also the most important, evaluation for your organization. We don’t spend time and money on training because it sounds like a good idea. Organizations spend time and money on training to improve results, such as improving sales numbers or reducing errors. You might also receive training to help you save time or frustration with your daily tasks.

How Can You Evaluate Results?

How to Provide Useful Feedback when Editing Documents

If you edit documents for your employees or co-workers, ensure you are giving the best feedback possible. Here are ways to be a great editor.

Give Specific Feedback

Employees need to know exactly what they have done right and what specifically needs to be improved. Saying good job isn’t specific enough. Neither is saying something like this could use some work. Writers need more guidance. How can you provide it?

Why Your Workplace Should Have a Style Guide

Do employees in your organization struggle with using consistent abbreviations, spellings, numbers and capitalization? Maybe you write Internet with a capital I but your co-workers spell it internet. Or you like organize with a Z while others spell it organise. None of these choices are inherently right or wrong. The issue is the lack of consistency. As an organization, you can avoid these consistency problems by using a style guide.

Editing Skills for Managers

If you want to hone your employees’ writing skills and encourage them to be self sufficient, you need to know how to be a good editor. Let’s take a look at ways you can do this.

Let Your Employees Do the Re-Writing

This can be a tough one. As managers, we often see what needs to be done to make a document better, and we think it will take less time to do the re-writing ourselves. Don’t fall into this trap!

Controlling Sentence Length

Writing is often plagued with sentences that are too long. The more words and relationships in a sentence, the more confused your readers may become. As writers, we need to remember that our brains process information better when it’s presented in small chunks.

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